West Virginia University’s number of expulsions in 2003 vs. 2005

While doing research for my thesis tonight, I found an article that I’ve been trying to find for a long time.

I remembered when I was in undergrad a freshman’s car was flipped and destroy as part of some celebrations after a big win. However, I couldn’t remember which time. I was in undergrad from 2002-2006, and there were at least three times I can remember fires being set. After West Virginia University’s win at Virginia Tech in 2002, fires were set in Morgantown. In 2003, there were fires set again when WVU beat Virginia Tech at home. And then in 2005 there were fires after a big basketball win. I don’t keep up with sports, so I couldn’t remember what game it was.

So tonight I found the golden article from the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – “West Virginia expels 11 for rowdiness.”

Following the 2003 Virginia Tech win, more than 100 fires were set in Morgantown. More than 40 students were identified as being a part of those fires, but WVU only expelled 7, according to the article.

In 2005, 16 students were arrested or cited by Morgantown police and fire officials for violations such as illegal burning and public intoxication. Telephone poles were scorched and four cars were flipped.

(In the photo below, the person marked “me” is not actually me, but the person who took the photo.)

(Photo credit: http://www.rhythmism.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20828)

Of those 16 students, 11 were expelled. The other five were expected to face suspension or probation.

The article also mentioned that following the 2005 incident Morgantown considered a 17-step plan to deal unruly crowds, such as purchasing a traveling temporary holding facility so officers are not taken off the streets when making arrests.

Last month when city officials met with WVU officials, Morgantown Police Chief Ed Preston said the main reason why they have to try to get rid of the large crowds instead of just starting to arrest people is because it takes officers off the street for 1.5 to 2.5 hours for one arrest.

What happened to that 17-step plan? Now I’m wondering what the other 16 steps are. I can’t find anything right now, but I’m going to keep looking. Does anyone remember anything about the plan?

– Leann

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Three men charged for Sunnyside Dumpster fire / News Round-Up

Here’s a quick round-up of one local story about Sunnyside and some other stories from around the country involving off-campus student housing.

Morgantown Police charge 3 men for Morgantown Dumpster fire – WBOY

Three men were served warrants over the weekend for pouring gas on a Dumpster fire in Sunnyside at the corner of Beverly Avenue and Fourth Street around 3 a.m. on March 11. Brendan Schweer, 23, Michael Howell, 23, and Corey Burns, 23, face malicious burning charges, which is a misdemeanor. According to WBOY, if they are convicted, the three would face a minimum $1,000 fine and have to reimburse the city for any costs of fighting the fire. Schweer and Howell are listed as students in West Virginia University’s directory, and Burns is listed as an athletic tutor. WVU has said it will consider suspending or expelling students who are charged with starting fires. However, WVU will not identify students who have been expelled or suspended.

Program makes bills easier between roommates – The Daily Texan

The company, Simple Bills, was created in 2008 by Baylor University students. All roommates must sign up, and the company will equally divide the bills and send the statements. Students will just pay once per month to cover all their utility bills. They do charge a fee for using the service. For Morgantown, each roommate would pay $4 per month. The purpose of the service it to try to prevent friends from fighting while trying to collect bills.

Housing to do preventative bedbug sweeps, focus on education – Daily Nebraskan

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln experienced a major bedbug problem in its dorms this year. In order to get rid of the bedbugs and to make sure they don’t come back, the housing department will fund two sweeps of the residence halls, in May and August. The sweep is estimated to cost between $35,000 and $40,000. Housing Director Sue Gildersleeve said that the university will also provide educational materials to students prior to move-in and will educate students about bedbugs early in the fall.

If you want to see where bedbugs have been reported in Morgantown, check out The Bedbug Registry.

The off-campus rental trap – BuffaloNews.com

A leasing agent told students if they signed a lease and paid a refundable $200 deposit to save an apartment, they wouldn’t be bound to anything because nothing would be final until their parents signed the lease papers. The leasing agent then kept pushing that whoever signed the form first would get a free t-shirt. Once the parents checked out the lease and decided it wasn’t right for their sons, they found they couldn’t get out of the lease as easily as promised. They were told the lease was binding, it would cost each tenant a $200 release fee and they would be responsible for finding new tenants to take their place.

Apartment hunting tips for college students – Chicago Tribune

Most students in Morgantown may have already signed their leases for the next school year, but I know that one year I waited until April to find a new place (and it was super stressful and I signed the lease on the first place I found. But I stayed there for two years because it wasn’t too bad of an apartment). For those procrastinators, this article may be of some help when they decide to start looking.

– Leann

Hunt’s pay not likely to be reduced despite cuts to Sunnyside Up’s funding

Sunnyside Up may not have much money to work with during the next fiscal year.

The Dominion Post published an article in Sunday’s edition about the Sunnyside Up funding cuts, and spoke to Councilwoman Jenny Selin, who is also a member of the Sunnyside Up board of directors. Selin said that it is not likely that Executive Director Jim Hunt’s salary will be cut.

Hunt receives a salary of approximately $86,000.

Selin told the DP:

“Once you hire someone, you usually do not go back and ask them to take less.”

As previously reported, Morgantown City Council voted to cut Sunnyside Up’s funding first by 25 percent in early March, then again another 25 percent a couple weeks later. West Virginia University matches whatever the city pays, so that means the university will also be cutting 50 percent of funding.

Last year, Sunnyside Up received $100,000 from Morgantown and $100,000 from WVU, totaling the group’s funding to $200,000. After the cuts, the group will receive a total of $100,000 in funding for the next fiscal year.

After Hunt’s salary of about $86,000, that would leave the organization with approximately $14,000 to use for operation.

Hunt is also a member of Clarksburg City Council.

(Photo credit: www.cityofclarksburgwv.com)

According to the Clarksburg Exponent-Telegram, council members earn $2,500 per year. The article also states that “Clarksburg council members may also opt to receive health benefits through the city of Clarksburg.” At the time of the article, October 2010, Hunt was one of the five council members who claimed full benefits.

According to the Dominion Post, Hunt said that he “doesn’t receive any health insurance or retirement through Sunnyside Up,” and that about $10,000 of his salary is in lieu of those benefits.

The most recent tax forms for Sunnyside Up available on GuideStar are from 2010 (PDF available here). Here’s a quick breakdown:

  • Total revenue: $204,842
  • Total expenses: $173,865
    • Salaries, compensation, employee benefits: $90,176
      • Hunt’s salary: $83,200
    • Professional fees and other payments to independent contractors: $25,309
    • Occupancy, rent, utilities and maintenance: $8,010
    • Printing, publications, postage and shipping: $4,008
    • Other expenses: $28,862

The organization is said to have savings in the bank, but will it be able to continue operating if it only receives approximately 14 percent of its usual funding?

– Leann

Mold at Rowan University / Update on West Virginia mold bill

Mold has been increasingly becoming an issue in Morgantown over the last year, and other areas are experiencing the problem, too.

In Glassboro, N.J., students are upset that mold isn’t being removed fast enough in the student townhouses at Rowan University.

According to the article on myfoxphilly.com, “University officials told students about the mold in this letter last month admitting they knew about the problem since last September.”

Despite knowing about the mold since September, university officials waited six months to alert students. They told the news station that the “problem is bigger than they first thought and they need more people to clean it all up.”

NJ.com says that “A Monroe Township-based environmental consultant has released a report alleging widespread mold contamination throughout the ventilation systems of 109 of the 113 townhouses on Rowan University’s campus.” Of those 113, 70 percent had “heavy to excessive” mold.

Edward Knorr — the principal environmental/health investigator with Quality Environmental Concepts who has been contracted by Rowan for 18 years — said after he performed mold investigations this winter, he advised Rowan officials about the problem and urged them to conduct further evaluations. Knorr said officials refused and banned him from the university.

However, Rowan University spokesman Joe Cardona says they are not ignoring any of these recommendations and are actually following the protocol laid out by Knorr. In addition, no students have reported negative effects from mold at this time, Cardona said.

Knorr said that a student had reported mold on her bedpost. After removal, mold kept returning, leading him to believe that it must have been coming through the heating system. When he looked inside the HVAC, it was coated with mold.

Mold on an HVAC system at the Rowan townhouses. (Photo credit: NJ.com)

So far, 24 units have been cleaned – 10 during winter break and 14 during spring break. Cardona said some things will be left until summer, “but only because it’s not harmful or disturbing students in any way.”

During West Virginia’s legislative session this year, members of West Virginia University’s Student Government Association worked to try to get a bill passed that would make landlords more accountable for removing mold.

House Bill 4425 died in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

I contacted Earl Hewitt, the SGA’s off-campus housing director who worked on creating the bill with members of WVU’s student legal services and the environmental health and safety staff, to find out what he plans to do next since the bill was not passed.

Hewitt said the next step for him is to get in touch with Sen. Robert D. Beach (D – Monongalia County), in order to build a better relationship with him for next session to get more pull in the senate. He also sent emails to the senators who sat on the subcommittee, and Beach was the only one to respond. He said he wants to be persistent with them to figure out what seemed to be the problems with the bill.

Another step Hewitt plans to take is to set up a meeting with people who were involved over the past year with drafting the bill to find “the best way to attack for next session.”

I did have some more follow-up questions for Hewitt, but he has not yet responded. When/if he does, I’ll be sure to update again.

-Leann

WVU won’t release expulsion numbers until May

When West Virginia University officials met with Morgantown city officials last month to discuss what to do about students starting fires, Assistant Vice President of University Communications Becky Lofstead said that the university needs to be more proactive by publicizing the number of students who are expelled or suspended so that students understand that there are consequences.

During the meeting, WVU officials said that students who were arrested during St. Patrick’s Day weekend would have their student conduct hearings the first week back from spring break, which was last week.

Students who were arrested could either be expelled or suspended during their conduct meetings.

Yesterday I e-mailed Lofstead to see if I could have the number of expulsions and suspensions related to the events surrounding St. Patrick’s Day. She responded today that the university “will aggregate the [numbers] for infringements for the semester, most likely, and get those routed in May – so as not to take a chance of revealing the identity of certain individuals.”

I understand the concern with not wanting to accidentally identify students. However, WVU officials said they wanted to be more proactive with getting the numbers out so students will understand they can’t just break the law and not be punished. Will releasing the number two months later still have an impact?

Also, it seems WVU will only be releasing a total for the entire semester and won’t specifically say how many expulsions/suspensions are related to the St. Patrick’s Day events. I have no idea how many students are expelled or suspended each semester, and didn’t have any luck finding that out with a quick Google search. I’ll keep checking, and will update if I find anything out.

– Leann

Huntington officials seek student involvement in city plans

Officials in Huntington, W.Va. are currently working on the city’s 2025 plan.

The comprehensive plan, Plan 2025, is updated every 10 years with new goals related to housing, aesthetic attractions and businesses.

A town hall meeting was scheduled on Marshall University’s campus to get feedback from students.

According to an article in The Parthenon, students were concerned with the location, cost, convenience and construction of housing.

Some students expressed that they preferred living in older housing to new housing developments because the older houses were charming and had more solid construction.

Another student also said it would be beneficial for both businesses and students if more people rented apartments above businesses in downtown Huntington.

The reason I brought up this article is that I think it’s great that Huntington officials ask students for their input on the city’s future plans.

Morgantown officials don’t typically seem to want input from students, especially when students cause trouble.

Most students may not be registered to vote here, but they still contribute to the economy. Students also make up approximately half of the city’s population for at least nine months out of the year.

Last week, a meeting was held to discuss a plan regarding the St. Patrick’s Day destruction in Sunnyside. The meeting was held during West Virginia University’s spring break. While the meeting did evolve into something bigger than was originally planned, it could have been beneficial to get student input.

WVU Student Government Association President Jason Bailey was the only student in attendance, but he didn’t speak at the meeting.

Threats of suspending and expelling students hasn’t stopped street fires. It wouldn’t hurt if the city and WVU asked students to give input on why they believe fires are started and what could be done to deter people from continuing the tradition.

I want to know what you think – do you think Morgantown officials should seek student feedback on issues related to the city? Why or why not?

– Leann

City and WVU officials agree that culture in Morgantown needs to be changed to stop fires

Some members of Morgantown’s City Council met today with the city’s fire chief, fire marshall and police chief, as well as several representatives from West Virginia University to discuss how to prevent students from setting street fires.

The thing they all agreed on – the culture needs to change.

Morgantown City Manager Terrance Moore started the meeting by saying it was originally meant to be for officials to discuss protocols and follow-up strategies for the fires that were set during St. Patrick’s Day weekend in Morgantown. They then extended the invitation to some property owners and representatives from West Virginia University.

City and university officials are used to fires taking place after games, but St. Patrick’s Day took them by surprise, Moore said.

“It’s gotten to a point where Morgantown is having this expeience not because of WVU students specifically, but because of the reputation,” Moore said. “[The problem has gone] above and beyond WVU students, and it’s been that way for a while.”

Morgantown Police Chief Ed Preston was given the floor first. He said the department had every available resource out working the night of St. Patrick’s Day – day and afternoon shifts stayed over and the evening shift came in early. The city currently has 62 police officers.

One thing he wanted to make clear is how officers handle situations like a large crowd of people rioting. In videos posted online, people can be seen throwing objects at officers. Preston was asked why those people weren’t arrested.

“We don’t have the manpower to make all those arrests,” Preston said.

When an officer makes an arrest, that takes them off the streets patrolling for 1.5 to 2.5 hours. Instead, officers try to stop or clear out the large crowd first, then address smaller issues.

Preston said he still had reserves he didn’t have to use, but he wasn’t satisfied with conduct of rioters or the results. Tear gas and bean bags were not used to clear out the crowds because overreaction would have escalated the situation.

Deputy Mayor Bane then asked if the police were helping the firefighters because some were being restricted from reaching fires and had objects thrown at them.

Morgantown Fire Chief Mark Casavasos said that was a common occurrence for them.

However, there were several areas where firefighters and police officers were on the scene working together, Preston said.

Preston blamed the culture of Morgantown for making people think it’s acceptable to burn couches, pointing out that businesses sell candles in the shape of couches (see below).

“We’re allowing and perpetuating this culture,” Preston said. “One bad weekend is only symptomatic of the culture.”

Corey Farris, WVU Director of Housing and Interim Dean of Students, said the university is not happy with the incidents, and that it’s not what they’re teaching students to do.

According to the student code of conduct, the university can take actions against students who break the law on or off campus. Once it has been reported to the university that a student has broke the law, the student is sent an e-mail, and within about two weeks will have to attend a student conduct hearing. The decision is then made whether or not to suspend or expel the student.

The university and city police alert the university when students break the law. Farris said they also catch students through posts on Facebook and by reading the newspaper.

Assistant Vice President of University Communications Becky Lofstead said that the university needs to be more proactive by publicizing the number of students who are expelled or suspended so that students understand that there are consequences.

Both Farris and WVU Police Chief Bob Roberts agreed that alcohol is the reason fires are started.

There were “far less problems” when bars were open to 2 a.m. instead of 3 a.m., Roberts said. Now the WVU police are doing more DUI arrests than ever.

“You have a tradition,” Casavasos said. “As much as you don’t want it, you have it. It’s not going away. I can see it carrying on 20, 30, 40 years.

“The problem won’t go to sleep following large scale events. We’ll continue to have this problem. We have to change this culture. The more we try to push it, the more they’ll do it. This is becoming a culture with them and a way to celebrate.”

Chief Casavasos had three suggestions to reduce fires:

  1. Give jail time for setting fires
  2. Double fines from $1,000 to $2,000
  3. Bring in the West Virginia State Fire Marshall because they are able to make arrests, unlike the city fire marshal

He continued to say that over the 14-15 years he’s served as a firefighter, the biggest problem is house parties, and he’s seeing them grow. He’s pulled 200-300 people out of two-bedroom apartments, and at one residence in Sunnyside there were 1,000 people inside.

The issue with having so many people in the houses is that the overcrowding could cause the house to collapse. Many of the houses are very old and aren’t built to hold that amount of people.

Bane expressed his concern already over next year’s home game against the University of Oklahoma and what kind of chaos will occur if WVU wins. He suggested a campaign going into the next school year that would show statistics of students suspended/expelled for setting fires.

Lofstead said they are already in process of doing something along those lines.

Hearings will begin next week for students arrested during St. Patrick’s Day weekend.

– Leann